Negotiate WELL Case Collection

negotiate-well-01.png

The Negotiate WELL collection provides multimedia, evidence-based materials for teaching and learning about gender in negotiation and career-related negotiations. The collection is inclusive of life experiences from early career to executive leadership, the boundaries of work and family, and historically marginalized perspectives.

To facilitate in-class or asynchronous instruction, you will find links to cases, a workbook, videos, slides, background readings, and teaching notes.

Teaching Plan: When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations (Price: FREE)
Length: 18 pages
Teaching Slides: When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations (Price: FREE)
Length: 27 slides
Learning Objective: The overarching learning objective is to help students recognize the situational circumstances that moderate gender effects in negotiation. Core lessons include: (a) A person’s gender is not a reliable predictor of their negotiation behavior or outcomes, (b) Gender effects in negotiation are most reliably predicted by situational factors, and (c) Two general categories of situational factors that tend to predict gender effects in negotiation are (i) the salience and relevance of gender in context (e.g., social-cultural context, intersecting identities) and (ii) ambiguity on what is negotiable, how to negotiate, and who are the parties. The lesson concludes with prescriptive suggestions for individuals and organizations to mitigate unwanted effects of gender in negotiation. See Related Reading on When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations
Related Readings [and Video Materials]: "When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations," by Hannah Riley Bowles, Bobbi Thomason and Immaculada Marcias-Alonso, Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, January 2022. Links to external site.
When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations with Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard VPAL event, June 2, 2022.
Abstract: A person’s gender is not a reliable predictor of their negotiation behavior or outcomes because the degree and character of gender dynamics in negotiation vary across situations. Systematic effects of gender on negotiation are best predicted by situational characteristics that cue gendered behavior or increase reliance on gendered standards for agreement. In this review, we illuminate two levers that heighten or constrain the potential for gender effects in organizational negotiations: (1) the salience and relevance of gender within the negotiating context and (2) the degree of ambiguity (i.e., lack of objective standards or information) with regard to what is negotiable, how to negotiate, or who the parties are as negotiators. In our summary, we review practical implications of this research for organizational leaders and individuals who are motivated to reduce gender-based inequities in negotiation outcomes. In conclusion, we suggest future directions for research on gender in organizational negotiations.

workbook.jpg

Workbook: How to Self Advocate for Work and Life Goals: A Strategic Preparation Workbook (Price: $2.50)
Length: 10 pages
Learning Objective:This workbook was designed to help individuals prepare strategically for their career negotiations. Core learning objectives include: (a) Broadening users’ perspective of the range of possible career-related negotiations (e.g., role, workload, pay); (b) Helping users recognize and prepare appropriately for three main types of career negotiations (i.e., asking, bending, shaping); (c) coaching users to employ negotiation skills to advance career goals, prepare systematically for negotiation opportunities, and search for mutually beneficial solutions with negotiation counterparts.

Videos: The following videos facilitate asynchronous learning by explaining the overall purpose and each section of the Strategic Preparation Workbook. Links to the videos are also accessible through links inserted at the beginning of each section of the Workbook.

Introduction (2 minutes 48 seconds)
Learning Objective: Introduces users to the Strategic
Preparation Workbook.

Asking, Bending, Shaping (3 minutes 48 seconds)
Learning Objective: It is valuable to understand whether you are seeking something standard (asking), requesting a special exception (bending), or proposing a change to the way you and others work together (shaping). Whether you are asking, bending, or shaping informs the arguments that will make you persuasive and with whom you need to negotiate to be successful.

Reducing Ambiguity (2 minutes 1 second)
Learning Objective: Figuring out what is negotiable and how to negotiate effectively is core to your negotiation preparation. It is also helpful to clearly understand who your counterparts are as negotiators and to clarify what you want others to understand about you.

Relationships and Negotiation (4 minutes 25 seconds)
Learning Objective: The mantra “enhance your negotiation through relationships and your relationships through negotiation” will help you achieve your current objectives and increase the potential for future cooperation with counterparts.

Intersectionality and Negotiations (4 minutes 45 seconds)
Learning Objective: The Strategic Preparation Workbook was intentionally designed to benefit diverse negotiators, particularly those from historically marginalized or less powerful groups.

Teaching Slides: Prepare Strategically for Career Negotiations
Related Readings: "Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021, (14 pages). Links to external site.
Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages).
"Briefing Sheet: 'Be SURE' You Are Prepared to Negotiate Well," by Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2230.4, (2 pages). 

vogel-smile.pngCase: Nadine Vogel: Negotiating Work and Life (Price $3.95)
Length: 43 pages plus video supplement
Learning Objective: This teaching case provides instructors an opportunity to explore the role of negotiation in career advancement, including work-life and professional challenges. The case is motivated by research on women’s career negotiations that expands the conversation beyond asking for higher pay to include integrative problem solving in relation to one’s work roles and work-life conflicts (Bowles, Thomason, & Bear, 2019).
Synopsis: This case tells the career story of a leader who rose from a humbling career start to head a new corporate division she envisioned to serve the financial needs of families with children with disabilities. The case recounts how Vogel negotiated pivotal points in her career path, including overcoming gender biases to her career advancement, generating integrative solutions to work-life challenges, and crafting opportunities for meaningful work.
Video: This case is accompanied by video supplements which are available to instructors with educator access.
Teaching SlidesPrepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Related Reading: "Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021, (14 pages). Links to external site.

Case: Angel Torres and Sequel: Angel Torres Sequel (FREE) 
Length: Main case: 2 pages; Sequel: 1 page
Learning Objective: This case is designed to facilitate a live, in-class discussion—either online (synchronous) or in person—about how to recognize opportunities to negotiate and prepare strategically for negotiations in ways that further the interests of all parties. Students will analyze potential negotiations and practice generating proposals that work for all parties involved. The article Self-Advocating in Early Career and the Strategic Preparation Workbook are related resources for students to apply concepts from the negotiating framework to their own career negotiations. This case, written from the perspective of an undergraduate college student beginning a summer internship, is designed to support negotiations to advance early careers.
Synopsis: The Angel case was developed from accounts by students and managers about challenges and opportunities in early career employment opportunities for students in technology and engineering jobs, particularly those from less privileged and historically marginalized backgrounds. The teaching plan is motivated by research on career negotiations and on implications of gender and other status-linked identities for career self-advocacy (e.g., see suggested background readings).
The case protagonist, Angel Torres, is a college sophomore who has been placed in their first summer internship. While Angel hopes the internship might lead to a full-time job after graduation, the work, so far, has been basic and has not provided Angel an opportunity to show their full abilities. Angel has an idea of how to improve the user interface of the company’s primary app but isn’t sure whether or how to propose the idea. Chatter among interns at work have given Angel concerns around pay. Angel also faces a work-family challenge involving a family chore that requires them to negotiate an alternative work schedule. To be gender-inclusive, the protagonist is described without reference to gendered pronouns. The central question for students is, what might Angel try to negotiate to improve their internship experience—and how? 
In the sequel case, Angel reaches out to colleagues and friends for information and advice to help inform their negotiation choices, illustrating the importance of reducing ambiguity through negotiation preparation.
Videos: This case includes a video supplement that is available to instructors as part of the teaching plan (embedded above).
Teaching Slides: Prepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Related Reading: "Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages). Price $3.95

Case: Priya Iman (FREE)
Length: 1 page
Learning Objective: This case is designed to facilitate a live class discussion—either online (synchronous) or in person—about how to prepare strategically for career-related negotiations. Students analyze a potential negotiation opportunity and learn how to make a proposal that works for both parties. When combined with the Strategic Preparation Workbook, students can immediately apply the negotiating framework concepts to their own negotiations. The case is designed to support negotiations of professionals in their early or mid-careers. Correspondingly, there are two options for background readings, “Self-Advocating in Early Career," or a Harvard Business Review article, “Negotiating Your Next Job,” which follow the same basic framework with adapted negotiation examples.
Synopsis: Priya, a graduate student of public policy, was offered internships from two units within the International Development Fund. One offered a good salary, took advantage of her past work experience but was longer than she wanted; the other, offered no pay but would give her the work experience she wanted and was the perfect length. The case details the offers and asks students to consider whether Priya has room to negotiate aspects of either offer.
Teaching SlidesPrepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Related Readings: "Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021. (14 pages) Links to external site.
"Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages). Price $3.95

Case: Maryam Hassan (FREE)
Length: 3 pages
Learning Objective: This case is designed to facilitate a live, in-class discussion—either online (synchronous) or in person—about how to recognize opportunities to negotiate and prepare strategically for negotiations in ways that further the interests of all parties. Students will analyze potential negotiations and practice generating proposals that work for all parties involved. The article Self-Advocating in Early Career and the Strategic Preparation Workbook are related resources for students to apply concepts from the negotiating framework to their own career negotiations. This case is designed to support negotiations to advance early careers.
Synopsis: Maryam and Sameer, brother and sister, were searching for an apartment in Hitech City, Hyderabad. Recent college graduates who were now starting jobs with high-profile technology firms, they wanted to lease an apartment together. The case details their challenge in negotiating with a potential landlord amid cultural and religious concerns. Maryam must address the landlord’s biases and concerns through a careful negotiation involving compromise, building personal relationships, and re-setting expectations.
Teaching SlidesPrepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Related Readings: "Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021, (14 pages). Links to external site.
"Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages). Price $3.95

Case: Shahana Patel (FREE)
Length: 2 pages
Learning Objective: This case is designed to facilitate a live, in-class discussion—either online (synchronous) or in person—about how to recognize opportunities to negotiate and prepare strategically for negotiations in ways that further the interests of all parties. Students will analyze potential negotiations and practice generating proposals that work for all parties involved. The article Self-Advocating in Early Career and the Strategic Preparation Workbook are related resources for students to apply concepts from the negotiating framework to their own career negotiations. This case is designed to support negotiations to advance early careers. 
Synopsis: Shahana had just received a job offer from a trendy global startup in India, but she was getting married in five months and wanted to negotiate for a short leave for the wedding and a transfer to the company’s Hong Kong office to be with her new husband. In balancing her career and personal goals, Shahana has to negotiate with both her fiancé and her potential new employer through a careful negotiation involving compromise and re-setting expectations.
Teaching SlidesPrepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Related Readings: "Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021, (14 pages). Links to external site.
"Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages). Price $3.95

Videos: The following free videos are part of the strategic preparation series and included in the workbook.


Introduction Video (2 minutes 48 seconds)
Learning Objective: Introduces users to the Strategic
Preparation Workbook.

Asking, Bending, Shaping Video (3 minutes 48 seconds)
Learning Objective: It is valuable to understand whether you are seeking something standard (asking), requesting a special exception (bending), or proposing a change to the way you and others work together (shaping). Whether you are asking, bending, or shaping informs the arguments that will make you persuasive and with whom you need to negotiate to be successful.

Reducing Ambiguity Video (2 minutes 1 second)
Learning Objective: Figuring out what is negotiable and how to negotiate effectively is core to your negotiation preparation. It is also helpful to clearly understand who your counterparts are as negotiators and to clarify what you want others to understand about you.

Relationships and Negotiation (4 minutes 25 seconds)
Learning Objective: The mantra “enhance your negotiation through relationships and your relationships through negotiation” will help you achieve your current objectives and increase the potential for future cooperation with counterparts.

Intersectionality and Negotiations (4 minutes 45 seconds)
Learning Objective: The Strategic Preparation Workbook was intentionally designed to benefit diverse negotiators, particularly those from historically marginalized or less powerful groups.

Teaching SlidesPrepare Strategically for Career Negotiations 
Length: 15 slides
Learning Objective: These slides are designed for use in conjunction with the Executive or Early Career cases (linked above) and the Strategic Preparation Workbook. The slides cover a four-step “Be SURE” process for preparing for a career negotiation. See Related Readings on “Negotiating Your Next Job” and “Self-Advocating in Early Career."

Teaching Slides: When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations
Length: 27 slides
Learning Objective: These slides are designed for use in conjunction with the teaching plan “When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations.” The slides illustrate situational circumstances that moderate gender effects in negotiation and conclude with prescriptive suggestions for individuals and organizations. See Related Reading on When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations.

"Negotiating Your Next Job: Focus on Your Role, Responsibilities, and Career Trajectory, Not Your Salary," Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, Harvard Business Review, January-February 2021, (14 pages). Links to external site.

"Self-Advocating in Early Career," Hannah Riley Bowles and Zoe Williams, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2203.0, (4 pages). 

"Why Women Don't Negotiate Their Job Offers," Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard Business Review, June 2014, (6 pages). Links to external site.

"Negotiating as a Woman of Color," Deepa Purushottam, Deborah M. Kolb, Hannah Riley Bowles, and Valerie Purdie-Greenaway, Harvard Business Review, January 14 2022, (11 pages). Links to external site.

"When Gender Matters in Organizational Negotiations," Hannah Riley Bowles, Bobbi Thomason, and Immaculada Marcias-Alonso, Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, January 2022, (14 pages). Links to external site.

"Reconceptualizing What and How Women Negotiate for Career Advancement," by Hannah Riley Bowles, Bobbi Thomason, and Julia B. Bear, Academy of Management Journal, December 2019, (27 pages). Links to external site.

"Briefing Sheet: 'Be Sure' You Are Prepared to Negotiate Well," by Zoe Williams and Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard Kennedy School Case #2230.4, (2 pages). 

 

For technical questions on accessing Negotiate WELL materials, please email hkscaseprogram@hks.harvard.edu. For substantive questions about the teaching materials, reach out to Hannah Riley Bowles at hannah_bowles@hks.harvard.edu.

Negotiate WELL is made possible thanks to the support of the Carol J. Hamilton Funds, the HKS Center for Public Leadership and Women and Public Policy Program, and HKS Case Program/SLATE.

×
×